ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS, EATING HABITS AND IMPROVEMENT OF SYMPTOMS WITH STRUCTURED NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION IN WOMED SUFFERING FROM ENDOMETRIOSIS AND CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN

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ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS, EATING HABITS AND IMPROVEMENT OF SYMPTOMS WITH STRUCTURED NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION IN WOMED SUFFERING FROM ENDOMETRIOSIS AND CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN

Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disorder where endometrial tissue forms lesions outside the uterus. Endometriosis affects an estimated 10% of women in the reproductive-age group, rising to 30% to 50% in patients with infertility and/or pain, with significant impact on their physical, mental, and social well-being. There is no known cure, and most current medical treatments are not suitable long term due to their side-effect profiles. Although endometriosis was first described more than 100

years ago, current knowledge of its pathogenesis, spontaneous evolution, and the pathophysiology of the related infertility and pelvic pain, remain unclear. Persons affected by this disease often use complementary therapies such as dietary changes to reduce their symptoms, and so it is important to investigate whether and how these therapies affect endometriosis symptoms. Although diet and nutrition play a major role in lifestyle changes that many women consider when confronted with endometriosis, there is a paucity of evidence-based literature available on this topic. No clear consensus recommendations have emerged on what food types to eat or avoid in order to reduce the symptoms of endometriosis and/or the underlying disease.

Our study aims to evaluate the effect of a targeted nutritional intervention on the improvement of clinical symptoms (pain, quality of life and inflammatory status) in women suffering from endometriosis with chronic pelvic pain.

The study is carried on by a multidisciplinary team including research dietitians, clinical nutritionists and gynecologists.